Serving the Goreville & Lake of Egypt areas since 1977

 

Teapot Cottage in Goreville to reduce operations

Posted December 18, 2013 by Joe Rehana in Community
Members of the Goreville's Women Club pose for a picture Tuesday afternoon at Teapot Cottage having an afternoon tea at their December meeting.  Pictured above are: Ann Stachowiak, Sylvia Kerley, Lois Kerley, Jan Anderson, Donna Eastman, Judy Dodge, Beverly Bishop and Dixie Terry.

Members of the Goreville’s Women Club pose for a picture Tuesday afternoon at Teapot Cottage having an afternoon tea at their December meeting. Pictured above are: Ann Stachowiak, Sylvia Kerley, Lois Kerley, Jan Anderson, Donna Eastman, Judy Dodge, Beverly Bishop and Dixie Terry.

Teapot Cottage owner and operator Dixie Terry, a long-time columnist for the Goreville Gazette, said that after hosting several hundred tea parties over the past 12 years that it was time to slow down.

Teapot Cottage on Sidney Lane in Goreville is set to reduce operations starting in 2014 with Terry saying she will continue to hold events at the cottage, but will no longer provide catering and party participation as she has in the past.

“It has been a great experience, meeting and serving so many different people,” Terry said.  “I will miss it, but there has come a time that rising at 4 a.m. has become too much.”

Terry said that although she has written for the Gazette for some time, neither she nor others have actually written a story about Teapot Cottage and with most of her guests arriving from out of town, she said very few in Goreville may even know Teapot Cottage exists.

“I knew there was a niche for ladies who wanted to dine on gourmet food and then visit afterwards,” Terry said of the Cottage’s early beginnings.  She said she woke her husband in the middle of the night with her new idea and that he quickly advised her to return to sleep because she was having a bad dream.  That bad dream stretched into 12 years of hosting tea parties and entertaining guests from all parts of the world and for all occasions.

“Our guests list includes truck drivers, rodeo riders, doctors, lawyers, judges, an Indian chief from Oklahoma and two Scotsmen who arrived in kilts,” Terry said of the variety of customers most people would not readily associate with tea parties.  “Bunco, bridge, domino and canasta clubs have arrived as well as church groups, Girl Scouts, Red Hatters, little girls’ tea parties, wedding showers, sororities and even goose hunters from up north have all enjoyed Teapot Cottage.”

When she first started hosting parties Terry depended upon the help of her three granddaughters, whom she thought should learn the “niceties of life” while earning a bit.

“After two months, one married and moved to Texas, one had a baby and the other turned sixteen and took a ‘real job’ at Long John Silver,” Terry said, adding that the business adapted and soon she was receiving help from two of her daughters along with several locals throughout the years. Guests have enjoyed a menu that “runs the gamut” from high tea fare of crumpets, cucumber sandwiches and petit fours to the most popular of occasions which are Teapot’s four-course luncheons.

“I hope someone in the area will continue the tea parties and luncheons,” Terry said, adding that she has donated most of her profits to community organizations as well as hosting dozens of complimentary teas and lunches for local fund raisers.

While Teapot Cottage may be slowing down, Terry is gearing up to release a book of recipes centered around tea parties sometime in the New Year, she said.  A fan of tea parties for as far back as she cares to remember, Terry has collected teapots for the past 50 years and quietly proclaims her passion with license plates that read: “T four 2.”